Stuffed Baked Potatoes: A Satisfying Meal

Stuffed Baked Potatoes: A Satisfying Meal

For all of you busy people out there, preparing healthy, filling, and cost-effective meals can seem daunting. But I have found one of the most satiating and versatile foods to be a solution to weekly meal preparation woes: the potato. Potatoes are not only delicious, they are filling, and can be baked in advance. Cooked baked potatoes store well in an open bowl in the refrigerator.

When you are ready to eat, you can grab a pre-cooked potato, reheat it, and top it with whatever you like: mustard, ketchup, relish, avocado, sauteed onions and peppers, vegetables. If you are in a real pinch, you can simply go with mustard and a side of vegetables. Use what you have on hand. The possibilities are endless.

Here are three ideas for ways you can top your baked potatoes.

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Fiesta Stuffed Potato: Topped with salsa, lime juice, cilantro, kidney beans, and fresh mango
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Buffalo Ranch Stuffed Potato: Topped with sauteed veggies in hot sauce and maple syrup glaze, cashew ranch dressing, veggie queso made from nutritional yeast, almond milk, corn starch, and garlic powder, and green onion (recipe inspired by The Happy Herbivore)
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Epic Veggie Stuffed Potato: Topped with pico de gallo, cherry tomatoes, chopped spinach, green pepper, basil, and chickpeas

Vegan Banana Bread

Vegan Banana Bread

Wow. This is the first post I’m writing since having my baby. It feels good to be writing and creating again. So many people have asked if I will be sharing info about my pregnancy and birth story, and yes that will be coming soon. But first… Banana Bread!

Ingredients
1 and 3/4 cup spelt flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp cinnamon
dash of nutmeg
3 very ripe large bananas
1/4-1/2 cup maple syrup*
2 heaping tbsp coconut oil
+extra oil to grease pan
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 tbsp applesauce

*I wanted a mild, lightly sweetened bread, but if you want a sweeter bread, add more maple syrup.

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Then grease a 9-inch loaf pan with coconut oil.

2. In a large bowl, mix all dry ingredients until well-incorporated.

3. In a separate medium bowl, mash bananas with a fork, then add in all remaining wet ingredients and mix together. I kept my bananas moderately chunky.

4. Add wet mixture to the dry mixture and mix with a large spoon until combined evenly. (I tasted the dough at this point and it was pretty delicious.)

5. Spoon out mixture into the loaf pan and spread evenly. Bake for about 40 minutes or until golden brown and the center comes out clean with a toothpick test.

I served mine with baked apples and pears (pictured below).

Enjoy!

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Committing to a Greener Lifestyle + 15 Tips for Living Low Impact

Committing to a Greener Lifestyle + 15 Tips for Living Low Impact

So You Want to Stop Wasting Resources and Money…

We’ve all heard it many times before: reduce, reuse, recycle. However, when it comes to the average modern-day person, I am not sure how much these guidelines are put into consistent action. I have always been fascinated with environmental studies and living in alignment with nature, so the topic of reducing waste and living a greener lifestyle really appeals to me. I get excited when I read about upcycling projects, composting, and reducing or eliminating plastics.

Over the years, in addition to reading books and articles on these topics, I found some documentary films that really ignited my passion for living a more environmentally conscious lifestyle. Some of these included:
Dirt the Movie
Last Call at the Oasis
No Impact Man
More Than Honey
Tapped
And the trailer to the upcoming film Island Earth
For a full list of documentaries I recommend, please visit my Wellness Resources page.

I recently learned about a young woman named Lauren Singer who lives a zero waste lifestyle in NYC. The contents of her 3-years worth of trash fit into a mason jar. After watching some of Lauren’s videos and reading her blog Trash is for Tossers, I was both inspired and impressed. Some might argue that this is possible for Lauren simply because she is a single person who lives in a city with easy access to bulk bins and outdoor markets. Perhaps. However, she still offers feasible ideas for many. And through Lauren’s writings, I discovered her inspiration was Bea Johnson, a wife and mother of two, who lives a zero waste lifestyle in California, and is the creator of Zero Waste Home.

Although I find these people very inspiring, and I light up with excitement whenever I read a low impact or zero waste article, I do not think it has to be an all-or-nothing venture, at least not for me (at least, not right now). There are many obstacles to living 100% of anything for me. I don’t like the extremism of living any which way; I tend to stick with things when I do my absolute best, and my best is never perfect. I have to be realistic with myself. One obstacle I have personally discovered is that I do not live near any stores that offer bulk bin shopping, but luckily I have a couple of options near where I work. Another obstacle is that I can see how avoiding all packaging would be quite the challenge for most consumers, me included. However, there are many other small steps I am doing to transition to a greener lifestyle, and perhaps some of these suggestions will help you too.

What I’m Doing to Live A More Earth-Conscious Lifestyle + Ideas for You:

1. Make Your Own Products
I currently make some of my own bath and body products as well as household cleaners. For the cleaners, I use ingredients such as fresh lemons, white vinegar, baking soda, and essential oils. Other items you can make yourself include toothpaste, mouthwash, body butters, facial toner, natural deodorant, and the list goes on.

2. Stop Buying Excess and Bringing Waste into the Home
This goes hand-in-hand with living a simple life and minimalism. It starts with reducing the future waste we bring into our homes in the first place. I try to avoid impulse buys as much as possible. Before I buy something new that I think I need, I will ask myself if I can make it, find it second-hand, or borrow it. Sometimes new is the best option, and sometimes it’s not.

3. Eliminate paper products and disposables.
This is a tough one, but there are some great options to try.

The Kitchen: I do buy an eco-friendly brand of recycled paper towels, but I try to use them sparingly. I keep them under my sink for cleanup emergencies. Since they are not on the countertop, we go through one roll of paper towels every 2-4 weeks. It would be great to reduce that even more. I now keep a basket of tea towels on top of my kitchen table for quick grab and go cleaning and use at meal time. I use glass storage containers and mason jars for the majority of my food storage. I avoid plastics, styrofoam, and disposable items with packaging when possible. Paper dishes and plastic utensils are totally out. Use ceramic and rewash your items. This saves money too. You can use a bamboo dish brush instead of sponges to clean your dishes, and opt for eco-friendly dish soap.

The Bathroom: I currently use organic cotton disposable feminine hygiene products, but I plan on trying a non-disposable option soon. Some options worth looking into are menstrual cups and organic cotton panty liners and pads like GladRags or Moon Pads. Instead of throwaway cotton rounds for facial toner, you can buy reusable organic cotton rounds. I also recommend fabric shower curtain liners, because the plastic varieties are horrible for human health and the environment. Another better option in the bathroom is natural, toilet paper made from recycled paper. Regarding razors, you can try a safety razor or the Preserve brand. Bamboo toothbrushes are compostable and also pretty fantastic. You can also buy a wooden and bamboo toilet brush, instead of a plastic variety. I like to make or buy natural, handcrafted bar soaps in bulk to avoid unnecessary packaging and help the waterways.

4. Cancel mail subscriptions, and register for a do not mail registry.
I have done this, and it helps minimize paper mail waste quite a bit. However, I sill find this to be a challenge, as we receive mail I never wanted. I wonder if I can return to sender with a note to not mail in the future.

5. Skip the disposable plastic bottles and filter your own water.
We use a Berkey countertop stainless steel water filtration system with added fluoride filters. I suggest reading up on the company as I highly recommend it, as well as other filter options to find something that is best for you. I then pack water in an Eco-Canteen or glass bottle with a lid. I save so much money this way. Even when I travel, I bring my Berkey to-go travel bottle and an eco canteen.

6. Bring your drinks, lunch and utensils to work and outings.
Use a reusable lunch bag and stainless steel, glass, cotton, or hemp storage options to pack your lunchtime goodies. Are you a coffee or tea drinker? Make your own at home and bring it in a reusable to-go mug or thermos. Not only does bringing your own lunch (and snacks) everyday save lots of money, but it’s better for your health because then you know the exact ingredients you are consuming, and reduces waste by way of plastic throwaway containers. Bamboo utensils, a stainless steel, or glass straw, and reusable water bottle are all good to keep on hand in your lunch kit and car.

7. Compost plant-based food scraps and other items.
I keep a large bowl in the refrigerator to prevent flies and any smell. I fill the bowl throughout the day with food scraps and dump it into my garden compost pile at the end of the day or early in the morning. This is a great way to bring nutrients back to the soil, helping the earth, the garden, and our environment by reducing waste that ends up in landfills. Some things you can compost include: fruit and veg scraps, dryer lint and dust bunnies, cooked grains, coffee grounds, paper or wood matches, flowers, tea bags and tea grounds, and much more.

8. Reuse cooled cooking water to water plants.
There’s no use wasting perfectly good plant water by dumping it down the sink.

9. Eat Seasonally, and Support Organic and Local Farmers.
The locovore (eating local food, usually within a 150 mile radius from where you live) movement is quite interesting and can be earth-friendly. It is a good idea to start paying attention to where your food is being shipped or imported from and when produce is in season. Organic local options are best. Get to know your small, local farmers and ask them about their growing practices. You can also consider joining a CSA (community supported agriculture).

10. Conserve Water
Only 1% of the world’s water is drinkable, and if you watch any of the water films I mentioned above, you will be quite alarmed by the future of our access to clean drinking water. When it comes to going green, this is one of the most important areas to learn about. We use rain barrels to recycle water and water our plants. We use a low flow shower head and I try to take short showers most of the time. For more ideas, here are 110 Ways to Save Water.

11. Be Mindful of Energy Consumption
During the daytime, all lights stay off in my house. We use the natural sunlight and mostly energy efficient appliances. I only turn on the air conditioner when I absolutely need it. I only wash clothes in cold water. At nighttime, we leave a light on only in the room we are currently using, and we also like natural candles which create a warm and inviting ambiance to the home.

12. Plant a garden and plant bee and butterfly friendly flowers.
You don’t have to have a big back yard to enjoy the beauty of gardening. You can create a window garden, a patio garden, or a potted garden on a deck. There are thousands of gardening resources online and at your local library. Growing culinary herbs is a great place to start.

13. Use reusable fabric produce bags and grocery totes.
You can make your reusable produce bags, or purchase these from Amazon or Etsy. You can even buy reusable sandwich and snack baggies, which are great to have. I like to buy smaller bags for bulk food items like dried beans, grains, nuts, and seeds. I transfer them to mason jars or recycled glass jars with lids when I get home from the grocery store.

14. Raise children the eco-friendly way.
This could be an entire blog post on its own, but I will keep it short since this article is already quite long. Some things I am planning on doing to be a more conscious parent include: cloth diapering, using cold water to wash laundry and hanging items outside in the sun to dry, using cloth wipes, breastfeeding, using glass bottles, using a bamboo spoon and bowl for baby food, making my own baby food and storing it in glass, avoiding plastics, buying clothing secondhand, and supporting eco-friendly. nontoxic wooden toy companies.

15. Eat a plant-based or vegan diet.
Realistically, this is one of the most important steps we can take to help the planet, people, and animals. Plant-based eating helps fight against many major issues that plague our planet, including: water pollution, land degradation, climate change, and global hunger. “We collectively raise, feed, water, kill, and eat over 65 billion animals each year for food …10 times as many people as we have on the entire earth… We have developed a complex system of producing more and more animals that use more and more of our resources, while leaving a massive amount of waste, pollution, and adverse climate change in their wake. … This system…is… heavily intertwined with our culture, politics, economics, and the suppression of the reality of its effect on our planet.” -Dr. Richard Oppenlander

Things I Would Eventually Like to Do:
1. Eliminate plastic garbage pale liners.
2. Set up a solar system.
3. Bring my own container for leftovers when dining out.
4. Ask more stores to offer bulk bin natural food options and put prepared foods in my own containers.

This post is not coming from a place of elitism or impracticality, in fact, quite the contrary. I can vouch that living a simple life and investing in reusable options does save heaps of money over time. The Earth is our only home, and in a very humble way I want to do my part to help, even if just a little bit. I’m not perfect, and I am not always able to follow all of these guidelines myself, but I do my best when I can, and I am fully aware.

Mary Signature

Kitchen food scraps to compost
Kitchen food scraps to compost

Organic Gluten-Free Vegan Food On a Budget: An Experiment

Organic Gluten-Free Vegan Food On a Budget: An Experiment

When we stop eating crap, we stop feeling like crap. A while back, I wrote a blog article called “Eating Healthy on a Budget: Cut Your Grocery Costs and Feel Amazing.” I priced out healthy food for a family of three for a week for $95.

Well today, I kicked it up a notch and this time I purchased a week’s worth of all certified ORGANIC food for two people from a health food store (in a state where the cost of living is quite high), which is not the most cost effective way to go. I approached it this way on purpose to experiment.

You see, I’m trying to settle the score that “healthy food (and vegan food) is too expensive,” when in fact it can be less expensive than standard American diet food or a meat and dairy based diet. So I purchased these items in the most expensive way possible, and also accounted for vegan Shakeology for two people (two superfood smoothies per day) as well as some convenience foods like organic Amy’s frozen veggie burgers. I also added in $5 to factor in other kitchen staples such as seasonings and condiments used for the week. With that said, my total came out to about $160 (or $80 per person).

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Now, a better way to do this to make this more affordable and practical, is you could easily grow many of your own organic fruits and veggies, pick your own from local organic farms, can and freeze foods, join a CSA or co-op, purchase dry goods in bulk, batch cook, purchase seasonal foods, go to farmer’s markets, shop sales, and do this for MUCH CHEAPER! There are blogs about eating plant-based on as little as $4 a day. And remember, this experiment was done in a pricey manner purchasing organic foods.

You can instead purchase organic when possible or personally necessary; because unfortunately, conventionally grown produce is cheaper. One method is to follow the guidelines of “The Clean Fifteen” and “The Dirty Dozen.” This will help save money as well, if you are flexible.

Trust me. I’m of modest means, and I’m not out of touch with reality. I understand that some families can only afford $50-$75 a week for food and sometimes that’s to feed more people. All we can do is our best. This is not about self-judgement or judgement of others. This is about making health a priority as much as we can within our means.

According to a USA Today report, “The latest numbers for a four-member family: a thrifty food plan, $146 a week; a low-cost food plan, $191 a week; a moderate-cost plan, $239; a liberal plan, $289 a week. Some food waste is built into these costs.”

Expensive foods are usually convenience foods. And with a little time and meal planning, you can reap the health and financial benefits of eating real food you prepare yourself where you know exactly what is going into it.

I would love for you to join my upcoming 30-day health and fitness challenge, “The Glow So Healthy Pre-Summer Challenge” where we will be using PiYo workouts and a plant-based meal plan to reach our health goals (starts May 3, 2015). The kit is $140, and I will be your coach and offer my holistic health coaching services for free. To learn more, please comment or email me for details. I will work with you to help improve your lifestyle habits so you can become the healthiest version of yourself. I hope to hear from you.
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Firefly Chai Frappé

Firefly Chai Frappé

I love chai, and when I saw the cacao-chai frappé recipe from The Whole Pantry App, I was inspired to experiment and create my own recipe, and it was divine! By the way, I highly recommend The Whole Pantry App in general. Not only does it boast beautiful photography, the app includes a multitude of recipes made from whole foods.

Ingredients

1 tray of ice
1 TBSP firefly chai from Mountain Rose Herbs
OR 2 chai tea bags of your choice broken open
1/2 frozen banana
1 TBSP raw hemp powder
1-2 cups almond milk, depending on the desired consistency
2 TBSP raw cacao powder
2-3 TBSP maple syrup

Directions

1. Crush ice in the blender first.

2. Since I used organic loose chai, I used a food processor to make the tea into a finer consistency first. A coffee grinder might work as well. Next time, I am going to try steeping the tea into a concentrate and using that in the smoothie, so the drink will be smoother. I recommend you try this as well if you are not keen on the drink having flecks of loose tea within it. However, the taste as is was incredibly delicious!

3. Add the chai tea or steeped chai tea concentrate and the remaining ingredients to the blender and blend together.

4. I topped mine with shaved coconut. Enjoy!

fireflychai frappe

Sprouted Tofu Grilled in Coconut Butter over Kale and Arugula

Sprouted Tofu Grilled in Coconut Butter over Kale and Arugula

This is a recipe for sprouted tofu prepared in coconut butter over kale and arugula topped with fresh ground white pepper, fleur de sel, and honey drizzle! It was delicious!

Ingredients:
3 oz. organic sprouted tofu, cut into thin squares
1-2 TBSP raw coconut butter
freshly ground white peppercorns, to taste
a sprinkle of fleur de sel (or sea salt to taste)
herbs of your choice; I used dried sweet basil
fresh kale and arugula
1-2 TBSP local raw honey (or sweetener of your choice)
1 TBSP balsamic vinaigrette (optional)

Directions

1. Heat a nonstick skillet on medium heat over the stovetop and melt the coconut butter.

2. Immediately place the tofu into the pan, turning often and pan searing until it becomes a light golden brown. You may have to lower the heat on your stovetop during this time.

3. Mix the kale and arugula in a large bowl. I used an abundance of greens, because it is healthy and filling. You can drizzle and toss the greens lightly in balsamic vinaigrette, if you like.

4. Place the cooked tofu over the greens and sprinkle with fleur de sel, pepper, and herbs.

5. Finally, drizzle the dish with honey and enjoy!

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Fresh Mango Cilantro Quesadilla with Kimchi & Avocado

Fresh Mango Cilantro Quesadilla with Kimchi & Avocado

This homemade, gluten-free and vegan quesadilla was so fresh and filling; the flavor combinations were exceptional. I am really proud of this one, and I hope you enjoy it too.

Ingredients
1 brown rice tortilla
1/4 of an avocado, smashed
1 handful of arugula
1/8 cup cilantro
1/4 of a ripe mango, sliced
1 tbsp soy-free veganaise
1/2 of a tomato, sliced
1-2 tbsp kimchi*

Always opt for fresh, organic, local ingredients whenever possible.

*Make sure you purchase organic, real kimchi or make your own. Many kimchi brands are filled with chemicals and junk your body does not need.

Directions
1. Lightly grill tortilla in a nonstick pan on low-medium heat for about 20 seconds on each side to soften

2. Layer your tortilla as desired. My best tip: Place smashed avocado on one side and the soy-free veganaise on the other side and then layer from there. This helps everything to bind together.

3. Fold the tortilla in half and then cook each side until golden brown and lightly crisped.

Enjoy!

Recipe yields one tortilla, but you can easily make as many as your heart desires.

I’ve priced each organic quesadilla at approximately $3.25 to make.

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